Using EclipseLovesCinder template

About a year ago, I created a template to use the Cinder framework within Eclipse. I still use it all the time, as I still find Eclipse a better C++ editor (although xcode is slowly catching up if you use the compile and use the latest LLVM). I recently decided to revisit it and update it to better fit the workflow I prefer, and fix issues I’ve over time found work arounds for.

With that I decided that it was time to give some new instructions so here they are. I’ll revisit this post with more details, but if pictures are a 1000 words this is a pretty big post.

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C++11 in Eclipse CDT Part 1 – Getting and Installing GCC4.7

This is the second part of a three part series on using C++0x11 on OSX via Eclipse. If you need a little bit more nudging, you might want to look at Part0 of this series, where I make the case that the Langauge is moving in this direction and as such does not make sense for us to use older outdated tools.

In this post I’ll discuss the process of getting and installing the GCC4.7 compiler. First we need to arm our computer with the right tools.

We’ll be configuring and installing the following tools:

  • Macports: A tool for configuring / building / installing  tools, binaries, etc from terminal on OSX similar to ports or apt-get
  • Xcode 4.2+ : Required for above
  • Xcode 4.2+ Command Line Support: Required to build macports
  • Eclipse CDT: Our editor

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C++0x11 + OSX + Eclipse: Part 0 – The Why

I use Eclipse CDT as my C++ editor of choice on my Mac at work and at Home.
It’s really a very good editor for C++. Xcode, is a decent editor. When doing iphone / mac OSX projects with Objective-C its an amazing editor. However it is very bad at C++, in my opinion Xcode 4 is much worse than Xcode 3 at C++ code editing.

Is it a conspiracy to nudge developers towards developing using (basically) Apple’s own Objective-C programming language? Maybe I’m not sure, however I do love Objective-C, it’s my second and sometimes first favorite programing language, behind only C++.

To be honest it’s probably not, since they support the Clang+LLVM project which supports C++11, in fact it supports more features than GCC4.7 and is a faster compiler.

C++ has matured so much in the last few years, and a large part of that is due to the Boost libraries. In fact Boost, is sort of used as a testing ground for C++ – and many parts of C++0x11 started off as Boost Libraries ( for-each, any containers, lambdas, smart pointers, thread ).

As an OSX affectionato, I have to admit that I was upset that my latest version of OSX ( Lion at the time of writing ) was using GCC 4.2… GCC 4.2.1 is from July 2007!. The compiler and accompanying library is over 5 years old! In computer years, from what I sophisticatedly computed, thats 1 zillion years ago. That doesn’t seem right… Apple is defineintly making amzing strides with LLVM+Clang compiler, it’s actually better and faster than the latest GCC (4.7 at time of writing), however Xcode is such aTERRIBLE C++ editor, often not providing auto-complete, and not being able to find references until upto a minute after click. One minute? That’s crazy.

Hearing all this talk about how great C++0x11 was, I wanted to use it. To be honest, a lot of the stuff can be faked using the amazing Boost libraries – some of which are now standard. However I felt ripped off, these are officially part of C++ I should be able to use them now right!? Well not on OSX you can’t – well at least not without a little bit of work.

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